Shock and awe we’re in Iraq

For many years now only a handful of Australians have publicly joined the chorus of opposing our illegal involvement in the war in Iraq.

A recent survey has shown that:

“Sixty-four per cent are opposed to Australian involvement in Iraq, and 50 per cent to Australian involvement in Afghanistan.” – Sydney University’s US Studies Centre.

Thank you fellow Australians. Now if we can only follow the British lead of withdrawing troops.

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7 Responses to “Shock and awe we’re in Iraq”

  1. weez Says:

    Shock & awe has devolved steadily into shuck & jive. King George is on the run- but is intent upon putting in some landmines for the succeeding US President to enforce the neo-con legacy.

    Expect a hot war with Iran before the US goes to their next federal elections.

  2. Red Ink Says:

    Soooooooki,

    Most Auatralians I am sure, have always been apathetic towards Iraq involvement. Most of us are against it, but really the impact has been little. I don’t know anyone who has been, nor anyone who knows anyone who has been. Our boys are not coming home in boxes. This is not like Vietnam.

    There is no “shock and awe” at home. The play is being acted out in a theatre far away. We are not involved. Our soldiers don’t seem to be too involved either – well, so far we have no casualties, so they ain’t doing much fighting and I don’t think they are heroes.

  3. weez Says:

    Red, you could be right- not enough Aussie body bags to alarm folks here. Regardless, Aus participation in an unlawful war at any level, this one entered into under false pretenses by the US, should be ringing every Aussie’s bells.

    While being highly doubtful that any prosecution could ever occur, I’d think that every military act on the part of an aggressor nation is a war crime of some nature. Toward that end, Australia is abetting Bush’s baseless aggression.

    Need I mention that Bush’s folly has run longer than WWII?

  4. Suki Says:

    Red Ink- sadly you are right.

    Whilst war certainly brings soldiers home in boxes, death is not the only devastating outcome.
    Many soldiers attribute mental health problems, up to and including PTSD, to their deployment to Iraq.

    Unfortunately, I know many people who are affected by their time in Iraq and Afghanistan, with everyone around them also suffering.

    Having said that, I don’t think combat deaths or combat trauma in Iraq, unless it becomes a regular occurrence, will alter Australia’s pervasive apathy to our role there.

  5. weez Says:

    …and speaking of Australian combat deaths… *sigh*

  6. Suki Says:

    *sigh* indeed weez.

  7. Graham Bell Says:

    RedInk, you said

    Our soldiers donít seem to be too involved either – well, so far we have no casualties, so they ainít doing much fighting and I donít think they are heroes.

    I see …. to which branch/chapter of the Republican Party and the George W Bush Defenders’ League do you belong?

    Strange as it may seem, military success is not measured by the number of casualties you suffer but by the politcal aims you achieve.

    That’s why the ancient Spartans allowed a general who won a bloody battle to sacrifice a chook at the altar whereas a cunning general who tricked an enemy into defeat without anyone losing a drop of blood got to sacrifice an ox. They thought cunning was greater than bravery alone. It’s a lesson lost on the boofheads of Washington and Canberra

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