Parkin: Is government secrecy in the public interest?
Wednesday December 07th 2005, 11:35 am

Scott Parkin (image abc.net.au)Ian Carnell, the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, investigated Parkin’s arrest and removal from Australia in September 2005 and has found it was based on "credible and reliable information." 

However, Carnell says "security reasons" prevent him revealing details of ASIO’s assessment. This means Parkin cannot challenge the ASIO ruling and subsequent deportation. (ABC News audio: Real Win MP3)

In case anyone needs reminding, government in a first-world representative democracy exists for the service of the people, not the other way around.  When government has the power to act with no justification to the public, without any means for redress of grievance, it has the power to act arbitrarily and capriciously for politically motivated ends. This is otherwise known as tyranny

If Scott Parkin had indeed been a provable threat to national security, he would have been remanded awaiting trial for terrorism or rioting offences, not deported and freed in his homeland. The official refusal to explain the true nature of Parkin’s alleged offence is all but an admission by the government that this action is wholly indefensible. 

Yet, John Howard wonders why there is such opposition to his proposed sedition offences.  Parkin’s case is incontrovertible proof that terrorism will be used as an excuse to suppress dissent, however peaceful and well-intended.

-weez 


3 Comments so far
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Great comments there. Scott seemed like a good bloke and his treatment ridiculous. Suspect ‘transparency’, is now out of order. Do we live in a democracy?

Comment by joe2 12.08.05 @ 6:07 pm

Democracy or tyranny?

I’ve mentioned machinegunkeyboard before, but I’m mentioning it again now because you should go and read this article.

Comment by zhasper.com 12.09.05 @ 8:07 pm

Joe, last I looked, we were more of a colonial leftover from a constitutional, imperial monarchy. We just like to musingly think of ourselves as a democracy due to those silly elections they keep having.

Remember that republic referendum we had a few years ago that Howard wholly screwed? We should do it again- and pass some laws to keep pollies from stuffing around with it. We should have a president, elected by popular vote- not by Parliament.

And while we’re monkeying around with the Australian constitution, we need a Bill of Rights more than any other English speaking nation on earth. We’re pretty much the only one that doesn’t have a constitutional Bill of Rights.

Comment by weezil 12.09.05 @ 8:20 pm



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